Author Topic: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification  (Read 13729 times)  Share 

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Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2015, 08:45:40 pm »
No problem Keith, I am quite keen to complete this project.

Unfortunately I will not be able to remove my Lada's tank this weekend......I need to face the Freezy Gauteng to collect some game biltong  :-\



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Offline ram

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2015, 03:04:54 pm »
Seeing those half fuel tanks it makes me wonder if it would be possible to use them as a template to make a fuel tank out of polyethyleen, and get rid of the rust problem forgood.

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2015, 05:42:13 pm »
Very good point - it is possible.  At work we deal with a local tank manufacturer who makes different tanks according to our own needs. They actually make their own templates, all we need to do is to send them drawings, and tell them exactly what we want. If I remember correctly, they charged us about ZAR5000.00 for an initial template for a smallish tank some time ago. After the initial template fee, they only charge us for the number of tanks they make.

As far as my own modification is concerned, my Lada's tank will be removed tomorrow. Due to unforeseen circumstances, my "biltong trip" to Gauteng will take place next weekend.





So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

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Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2015, 07:42:41 pm »
So my Lada's tank has been removed during this weekend.

After the rear seat has been removed, I was a bit shocked. When I saw this, I immediately started worrying about the tank:



I then removed the tank cover, and was really impressed. Man this tank looks brand new, and in good condition:



I almost immediately realized that it would not be easy to make the tank bigger - the front part of the tank is sitting under part of the plate just in front of the tank :



I then removed the fuel pickup, and got a bit of a shock.  Eish....the pickup is badly rusted, and the filter at the end of the pickup pipe is completely blocked. The float arm is also quite tight, and is probably the cause of very inaccurate tank level readings at the gage:



I then emptied the fuel into a bucket, emptied the bucket, and  found this at the bottom at the bucket:



Then I had a quick look at the inside of the tank..... man die tank is moer vuil binne:



The inlet pipe is also rusted:



Hopefully I will find time to cut the tank in half, and forward more pics during  this week.


So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

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Offline Spikes

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2015, 07:26:03 am »
Thanks again for the pictures. At this point,  what I would do with the tank, is the following:

Throw a known number of large hexagonal nuts into the tank. Close openings where nuts may fall out
Wedge it in a concrete mixer(not with concrete mix ;D)
Spin for 30 minutes
Empty out the nuts
Count the nuts make sure all are out
Wash out the inside and dry with hot air
Once dry dump 1liter of kurust rust preventing paint in,  close all holes
And spin in the mixer for another 15 minutes
Let cure for a day or two and refit

@Danie, sorry hijacking the post some members might be wary of cutting tanks in half nor have the financial l means for galvanising.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 07:51:52 am by Spikes »

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2015, 07:49:47 pm »
No problem Spikes, this should work - as long as all dirt gets removed from the tank, before the preventing paint gets applied.

 I have been warned that:
1. The preventive paint will NOT stick to dirt inside the tank - and when it does not stick, it can easily cause more problems than the original dirt inside the tank.

2. The preventive paint gets mixed with a hardener, and the mixture will cure within 10 minutes. So time to cover the complete surface inside the tank is very limited.



So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

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Offline Spikes

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2015, 07:47:49 am »
note that Kurust reacts with rust(iron oxide)to form the new   rust preventative layer in the tank. The idea is just to remove loose dirt and flakes

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2015, 07:43:37 pm »
Eish........I just sent a couple of photos , and everything just disappeared    :-\

I hope to try later during this week again.

« Last Edit: October 02, 2015, 06:46:03 pm by Danie »
So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

You will never reach your destination if you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks  - Winston Churchill.

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2015, 06:35:33 pm »
Just an update regarding the tank project:

Since my previous post my Lada's tank has been cut in half, and a LOT of rubbish has been found inside the tank:






Then the  top half of my L:ada's original tank has been sent for zink plating, and the seem has been welded afterwards:



I then bought a product called "Flowcrete 340 White", to protect my Lada's tank in future. This product is locally commonly used for restoring fuel tanks, and according to the supplier all container tanks at the Durban refineries have been coated at the  inside with this product:


This product  is only suitable at temperatures lower that 70 deg Celsius, and I used a roller brush to apply the product only at areas where it would not be effected by heat during the welding process:



Before the two halfs of the tanks have finally been welded together, the zink plating at the tank seems has been removed with a grinder, as well as wire brush. During the welding process the zink plating would turn into dust, and would probably prevent the Flowcrete product to stick properly to the tank during the future coating process:






A final look at the upper half of the tank, before the final welding took place:



Finally welded, tested for possible leaks, and painted with Black Oxide at the outside to prevent rust for the time being:



All welding and cutting were done by the guys at work. At the moment I am still using the Flowcrete product , during a "rolling process" - The tank gets "rolled" on it's sides while some of the Flowcrete product still gets poured into the tank. This will hopefully ensure that the complete surface at the inside of the tank will be covered by this product.

« Last Edit: October 02, 2015, 06:51:01 pm by Danie »
So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

You will never reach your destination if you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks  - Winston Churchill.

Offline Spikes

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2015, 06:29:57 am »
Very neat Danie

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2015, 07:42:22 am »
Thanks Spikes.

Just some advice to anyone who wants to restore a tank as well.

 To my experience, there is no "easy way" to do this. I did a lot of reading, and I tried some "good advice" at several sources before I eventually decided rather to open / cut two tanks in half, and fabricate one tank from the two tanks. I discovered that the "good advice" I tried, was nothing other than bullsh@t. For example:

1. I initially tried to clean my spare tank just by using vinegar,  flushing, shaking and using a high pressure cleaner. I tried this numerous times, for one week. In short, I failed to remove all dirt inside the tank - after a week's hard work I still discovered a LOT of dirt at the other side of the baffle, when I opened the tank. Because of this dirt, the Flowcrete product would NEVER stick to a big part of the tank, and would probably cause more problems if all dirt has not been removed.

2. According to some advice at the Internet, two stroke oil will prevent further rust after vinegar has been used to remove rust from a tank. This is absolute bullsh@t. I used vinegar, and immediately afterwards a STRONG mixture of the best two stroke oil available. Within less than 20 minutes, there were clear indications of condensation, and the tank started rusting again.

3.Take special care when you are listening to "expert" advice - the manager of a local radiator firm advised me just to use the "shaking and flushing" method........after they destroyed one of their customer's tanks after cutting it in half, and then trying to weld it together again. Although they are "professional, they clearly did not know what they were doing....

4. To conclude - before applying any product inside the tank (like Flowcrete), all dirt inside the tank MUST be removed, because any dirt will prevent the product to stick to the tank metal.
 I have been warned about this by a very reputable mechanic. When any product does not stich to the tank metal, this can even cause more problems than the original dirt inside the tank....



So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

You will never reach your destination if you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks  - Winston Churchill.

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2015, 09:15:33 pm »
Done.

The  parts of the tank which haven't been covered with Flowcrete have also been covered, by "rolling" the tank on it's sides - after more Flowcrete has been poured into the tank. I spent quite some time to make sure that this product gets into the grooves at the opposite side of the welding, and  cover the complete surface inside the tank.

A poor photo of the inside of the tank. The straight line at the center of the photo is the groove at the opposite side of the welding, filled and furher sealed with Flowcrete:


Total cost of project:

Initial wasted money on white vinegar (original tank) R120.00
Labour (cutting, cleaning and welding) : Free of charge - done by the helpful guys at work.
Zink plating : Free of charge - we deal with the company quite often, and they did not charge me for the plating.
Flowcrete 340 White : R440.00 (for 2 liter of this product).

Total cost: About R560.00.
So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

You will never reach your destination if you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks  - Winston Churchill.

Offline Wesley

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2015, 07:12:49 pm »
Very glad I read this post before going Gung-ho with my tank. I was just about to start taking it out this week.... Very informative, thanks Danie. Now to find the time to do it properly 😉

Offline Danie

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2016, 08:52:33 pm »
Just an update about this project. Before final installation, I realized that the Flocrete didn't seem to dry properly at certain spots after the tank has been "rolled" to cover the welding at the seams. At one stage I was worried that the Flocrete would never dry properly at these spots, but eventually everything worked out well.
 Looks like one should rather apply a thin layer of this product at a time, otherwise it might take quite some time to cure properly.
So you have enemies ?    Good.   That means you stood up for something, some time in your life  -  Winston Churchill.

You will never reach your destination if you stop to throw stones at every dog that barks  - Winston Churchill.

Offline Conrad

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Re: Fuel Tank Cleaning and Modification
« Reply #29 on: June 30, 2016, 09:56:27 pm »
Danie where did you buy the Flowcrete from? Was it a retail store, or can you only get it from the manufacturer directly?
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